Reports

Report | Environment Washington Reseach and Policy Center

A Citizen's Guide to Energy Efficiency

The good news is, America can reduce its energy consumption 40-60% by mid-century, simply by using better technologies and eliminating waste across our economy—and those reductions are the lowest-cost climate solution we’ve got. There’s plenty we can do as individuals, plus we need our governments and other institutions to lead the effort, providing us with policy tools and continuing to advance technological solutions.

Report | Environment Washington Research and Policy Center

Trouble in the Air

A new report finds that in 2016, 73 million Americans experienced more than 100 days of degraded air quality with the potential to harm human health. That is equal to more than three months of the year in which smog and/or particulate pollution was above the level that the EPA has determined presents “little to no risk.” Millions more people in urban and rural areas experienced less frequent but still damaging levels of air pollution.

Report | Environment Washington Research and Policy Center

Electric Buses

A new report shows that a full transition to electric buses in Washington State could avoid an average of 89,567 tons of climate-altering pollution each year -- the equivalent of taking 17,291 cars off the road, and highlights King County’s leadership in transitioning to an all-electric bus fleet.

Report | Environment Washington

Shining Cities 2018: How Smart Local Policies Are Expanding Solar Power in America

Solar power is expanding rapidly. The United States now has over 53 gigawatts (GW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity installed – enough to power 10.1 million homes and 26 times as much capacity as was installed at the end of 2010.[1] Hundreds of thousands of Americans have invested in solar energy and millions more are ready to join them.

Report | Environment Washington Research & Policy Center

Troubled Waters 2018

Over a 21-month period from January 2016 to September 2017, major industrial facilities released pollution that exceeded the levels allowed under their Clean Water Act permits more than 8,100 times. Often, these polluters faced no fines or penalties.

Pages