Home

More Research, Policy, Education & Action

News Release | Environment Washington Research and Policy Center

New report highlights how toxic “accidents waiting to happen” threaten U.S. waterways

Facilities storing billions of gallons of toxic waste threaten America’s rivers and millions of people who live near them, according to a new report from the Environment Washington Research & Policy Center, WashPIRG Education Fund and the Frontier Group.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post

A new wave of legislation against offshore drilling | Kelsey Lamp

Earlier this month, a group of legislators from both coasts signed onto a wave of eight bills in Congress aimed at blocking the Trump administration’s offshore drilling plan.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment Washington Research and Policy Center

Climate solutions from Day One

Governors have the power and opportunity to lead their states in adopting solutions to the climate crisis. On January 11th, Environment Washington released a new report, Climate Solutions from Day One: 12 Ways Governors Can Lead on Climate Now, detailing actions governors can take immediately to significantly reduce planet-warming carbon pollution and ensure a more stable climate for their states and the nation.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment Washington Research and Policy Center

Putting solar panels on new homes could grow Washington’s solar capacity over 45-fold

If builders start putting solar panels on all new Washington homes in 2020, the state could increase its current solar power capacity by over 45-fold by 2045, according to a new report released by Environment Washington Research & Policy Center. Such a policy could also cut annual carbon dioxide emissions from energy use by 4.9 percent of 2015 levels by 2045.

> Keep Reading
Report | Environment Washington Research and Policy Center

Renewables on the Rise 2018

Wind turbines and solar panels were novelties 10 years ago; today, they are everyday parts of America’s energy landscape. Energy-saving LED light bulbs cost $40 apiece as recently as 2010; today, they cost a few dollars at the local hardware store. Electric cars and the use of batteries to store excess energy on the grid seemed like far-off solutions just a few years ago; now, they are poised to break through into the mass market.

Clean energy is sweeping across America, and is poised for further dramatic growth in the years ahead.

> Keep Reading

Pages