Reports

Report | Environment Washington Research and Policy Center

Road to a Fossil Free Washington

This report finds that Washington has the wind and solar resources to meet all of our energy needs, while also powering an electrified, emission-free transportation system in which our existing vehicle fleet is fully replaced with electric cars, trucks and buses. The time has come for Washington to aggressively expand the use of electric vehicles … and to ensure that they are fueled by energy from the sun and wind by setting strong goals for production of renewable energy. 

Report | Environment Washington Research and Policy Center

Renewable Energy 101

Environment America designed a series of 10 fact sheets as a resource for students, faculty and administrators interested in moving their campus toward sustainability. The fact sheets have been crafted to illustrate the importance, challenges and opportunities of 10 important and distinct tools associated with building a 100 percent clean, renewable energy system. Each fact sheet includes two case studies of effective action on college campuses, as well as a list of resources.

Report | Environment Washington Research and Policy Center

Rough Waters Ahead Factsheet

Millions of Americans live in the Puget Sound watershed, and millions more come each year to fish, boat and enjoy its water and wildlife. But intense human activity has polluted the Sound. The Environmental Protection Agency has been vital to protecting Puget Sound, holding polluters accountable and working with state, local and tribal governments to clean up and restore the Sound. That work is in jeopardy because the Trump administration has proposed cutting the EPA’s budget by 31 percent.

This fact sheet summarizes the findings of our Rough Waters Ahead report.   The full report can be found on the homepage.

Report | Environment Washington Research and Policy Center

Rough Waters Ahead

Puget Sound’s beauty hides some of the challenges it faces. Salmon and other wildlife populations struggle, past industrial pollution in some areas has made fish unsafe to eat, and untreated sewage pollutes shellfish beds. But with the dedicated work of local, state and federal governments – along with residents – the long process of restoring Puget Sound to health is underway. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been essential to those efforts – supporting and working with state and local efforts to keep pollution out of our waterways, hold polluters accountable, restore degraded waterways to health, and study and monitor Puget Sound to ensure its future health and safety. That progress is now in jeopardy. The Trump administration has proposed deep and devastating cuts to the EPA’s budget. Even if the president’s proposed cuts are scaled back by Congress, they would still have profound negative impacts on the agency’s ability to deter pollution from industrial facilities, agriculture, sewage treatment plants, runoff and other sources, while undercutting efforts to restore iconic waterbodies such as Puget Sound.

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