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Why we need the Clean Water Rule | John Rumpler

Why do we need federal protection under the Clean Water Act if there are also state laws designed to protect our rivers and streams? The answer is that, all too often, state officials fail to enforce their own laws or side with politically-powerful polluters.

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Time to ban the beads | Russell Bassett

We all want our teeth to be clean after brushing, and our bodies to be clean after showering, but did you know the products used in these everyday activities could be harming wildlife? Hundreds of commonly-used household products contain tiny plastic microbeads, which can be a big problem for our environment. 

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News Release | Environment Washington Research and Policy Center

Interactive map shows local impacts of weather-related disasters

100% of Washingtonians lives in counties affected recently by weather-related disasters, including the droughts and wildfires that ravaged Washington this summer, according to new interactive map using data from the federal government. Scientists say global warming is already exacerbating some extreme weather events and their impacts.

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News Release | Environment Washington

New Report: Solar Energy Per Person Grew 56% Percent in Washington State Last Year

Per capita solar power capacity grew 56% percent in Washington last year, according to a new report by Environment Washington Research & Policy Center. The growth rate put the state 15th in the country for solar power capacity per person added in 2014, but Washington remains stuck in the middle of the pack at 25th for total solar capacity and total solar capacity installed in 2014.  Despite its great potential in Washington state, solar power faces obstacles without continued and greater leadership from our elected officials.

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Report

Lighting the Way

Solar energy is booming. In just the last three years, America’s solar photovoltaic capacity tripled. In 2014, a third of the United States’ new installed electric capacity came from solar power.

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